By Angie Georgeff

Ever since I read Mark Twain’s “A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court” as a young girl, l have wanted to experience a total eclipse of the sun. The enterprising Yankee’s knowledge of history, in particular the date and timing of the solar eclipse of June 21, 528, saves him from execution and elevates him to one of Arthur’s most honored advisors. I had wondered for some time why no one but me seemed to be getting excited about the upcoming eclipse, but it seems the rest of America is catching up with me at last.

The drop-in event that we are hosting on Saturday, Aug. 12, will help Unicoi County get ready for the big day. Be sure to join us sometime between 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. to learn about the solar eclipse and—most importantly–how to view it safely. I ordered my ISO-certified eclipse viewing supplies last month, but if you’ve not yet purchased yours, be advised that we have a fairly large but finite number of eclipse viewing glasses we received from NASA that will be distributed free of charge at this event.

Once you have been informed and supplied, then you’ll just have to cross your fingers and hope for good weather! If this eclipse gets rained out, our next opportunity won’t present itself until April 8, 2024. On that occasion, it appears that only Tennessee’s extreme northwest corner may be touched by totality. If I enjoy this eclipse, I think I may visit relatives in Ohio for that one!

Jane Austen Film

Festival

This week’s film adaptation will explore another of Jane’s most loved novels. The terms of our site license prevent me from naming it in this column, but the titles and scheduled dates of all the movies are available here in the library. Join us at 6 p.m. on Thursday, Aug. 10 for free popcorn and a movie. You may bring a bottle of water or your favorite soft drink, as well. Just make sure the container has a spill proof cap!

Spotlight Book

When Isa, Kate, Fatima and Thea attended Salten House boarding school on the English Channel, they developed a pastime they called “The Lying Game.” The quartet competed to determine which one could persuade their fellow students and teachers to believe the most outlandish lies. Nearly two decades have passed and Kate, who still lives in her father’s decaying millhouse, sends her former friends a text message that pulls them back to Salten. A dog playing fetch has retrieved a human bone from the estuary. It appears that secrets long hoped to be buried are returning to the surface.