Local News

Story published: 02-11-2014 • Print ArticleE-mail Story to a Friend

Reading books online popular

By Angie Georgeff
The Erwin Record

We know you are out there. We may not know your names, but we see the usage statistics—numbers that go higher every month. So who am I talking about? Our patrons who use R.E.A.D.S, the Regional eBook and Audiobook Download System, that’s who.

With R.E.A.D.S, your Unicoi County Public Library card and a compatible device, you may borrow eBooks or audiobooks. Since the books return themselves at the end of the loan period, you will never have to pay a late fee or drive through snow to the library (or our drop box in Unicoi) to return these materials. And you can borrow a book at 3 a.m. in Wellington, New Zealand, if that is where you are, as long as you have an internet connection.

Children’s books have long been available on the R.E.A.D.S website--and they still are--but now they also are available on a separate site. Parents can bookmark this new website (http://reads.lib.overdrive.com/kids) to provide their children with a safe and more efficient browsing experience. Or you can simply follow the link from the main R.E.A.D.S page. Click on the blue and chartreuse “OverDrive for Kids eReading Room” icon one-third of the way down the page.

Regardless of how you get there, the new kids’ website contains eBooks and audiobooks that are just for children, and which can be searched by interest, subject or reading level. Since this site filters the entire R.E.A.D.S collection to show only the children’s content, kids find the titles they want and start reading faster! As a proud grandmother, I’m in favor of any technology or tactic that gets my grandchildren to read.

2014 Children’s

Book Awards

So what might your children like to read? The 2014 Newbery Medal for the most distinguished contribution to American literature for children was awarded to Kate DiCamillo, the author of “Flora and Ulysses: The Illuminated Adventures.” What happens when a squirrel gets sucked whole into a vacuum cleaner? When Flora Belle Buckman resuscitates the lucky rodent, he can fly and write poetry. He just can’t spell. Now can he survive the attempts of Flora’s romance-writer mother to exterminate him?

The Caldecott Medal, awarded annually to the artist of the most distinguished American picture book for children, went to Brian Floca, who is both the author and illustrator of “Locomotive.” It is 1869, and the First Transcontinental Railroad has just been completed. “Locomotive” tells the story of a family journeying from Omaha, at the eastern end, to Sacramento, at the western terminus.